https://hpa.unibo.it/hpa/gateway/plugin/AnnouncementFeedGatewayPlugin/atom Histories of Postwar Architecture: Announcements 2021-05-21T14:28:02+02:00 Open Journal Systems <p><strong>Histories of Postwar Architecture (HPA) – ISSN 2611-0075</strong> is a biannual open-access peer-reviewed Journal that aims to publish innovative and original papers on postwar architecture, with no geographical, methodological, historiographical or disciplinary restrictions.</p><p>HPA is a<strong> scientific journal</strong> recognized by ANVUR (Italian National Agency for Evaluation of Universities and Research Institutes) for disciplinary areas 08 and 10.</p><p> </p> https://hpa.unibo.it/announcement/view/455 Leonardo Ricci - Call for Papers - HPA 10/2021 2021-05-21T14:28:02+02:00 Histories of Postwar Architecture <p>Leonardo Ricci (1918-1994), eclectic figure in the architectural study of the postwar period in Italy and abroad, received his education under the guidance of Giovanni Michelucci in Florence, where he had several academic assignments starting from 1945. He was Director of the Town Planning Institute from 1965, Head of the Faculty of Architecture from 1971 and visiting professor at M.I.T. (1959-1960), Pennsylvania State University (1965-1969), University of Florida (1969-1972), and Kentucky University (1972-1980s). George Braziller, editor of Ricci’s book <em>Anonymous (XX century)</em> (1962) defined him as “a visionary profoundly concerned with the state of twentieth-century man in what he consider[ed] to be a time of transition between an old civilization and a new civilization struggling to be born.… He [saw] architecture as a creative act, and the obligation of the architect to make the actions of man come alive”.</p> <p><br>Ricci strongly believed in the potential of art, architecture, and the synthesis of the arts to build a suitable world for the 20th-century man. His work ranged from designing community space during the postwar reconstruction in Italy to microstructural models as a response to a growing need in contemporary architectural culture.</p> <p><br>His work across the decades could be understood through the “form-act” design method, which was founded on the refusal of a priori forms and on the belief that morphological results could be achieved after analysing human actions and activities.<br>Leonardo Ricci’s existential position shifted from the search for a new vision of the world and spread to architecture after World War II, apparently detached from the study of the human soul yet deeply involved in the fervour associated with the city.</p> <p>His conception of “anonymous architecture” marked a precise effort to achieve a necessary change in architecture and urban planning by investigating the field of Visual and Urban Design.</p> <p><br>Histories of Postwar Architecture Open Lab contributed to the celebrations for Leonardo Ricci’s centenary in 2018 by participating in studies and contributing to the digitisation and cataloguing of the materials kept at Casa Studio Ricci (Monterinaldi, Florence) thanks to the gracious permission of Clementina Ricci and Gerd Ricci, granddaughter and daughter-in-law of the architect, with the support of Fondazione Michelucci.</p> <p><br>In agreement with the mentioned partners, to which the CSAC must be added, the issue will include the publication of a selection of archival materials gathered for the RICCI100 initiatives.</p> <p><br>The issue is open to contributions relating to every aspect of Leonardo Ricci’s multifaceted activities and has the goal of stimulating a debate on his eclectic figure of architect, painter, scenographer, teacher and visual, urban and interior designer in order to produce a complete overview of his works and to consider his legacy.</p> <p>Papers should be submitted using <a href="https://hpa.unibo.it/user/register">https://hpa.unibo.it/user/register</a><br>The guidelines for paper submission are available at<br><a href="https://hpa.unibo.it/about/submissions#authorGuidelines">https://hpa.unibo.it/about/submissions#authorGuidelines</a><br>Please, fill in the author’s profile with all the informations required as:<br>• Applicant’s name<br>• Professional affiliation<br>• Title of paper<br>• Abstract<br>• 5 keywords<br>• A brief CV (max 2,000 characters)<br>Please submit the proposal in the form of MS Word (length between 20,000 and 80,000 characters). The submitted paper must be anonymous. Please delete from the text and file’s properties all informations about name, administrator etc. Papers should clearly define the argument in relation to the available literature and indicate the sources which the paper is based on. All papers received will go through a process of double-blind peer review before publication.</p> <p><br>HPA also looks for contributions for the review section.<br><a href="https://hpa.unibo.it/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies">https://hpa.unibo.it/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies</a></p> <p>Authors must submit directly full papers by <strong>December 31, 2021</strong><br>Accepted authors will be notified by <strong>January 31, 2022</strong><br>Publication is expected to be in<strong> June 2022</strong><br>To addressed questions to the editors:<br><strong>redazione.hpa@unibo.it</strong></p> 2021-05-21T14:28:02+02:00 https://hpa.unibo.it/announcement/view/407 Impatient Cities of the Gulf: Post-oil Architecture in Flux - Call for Papers - HPA 8/2021 2020-07-30T00:00:00+02:00 Histories of Postwar Architecture <p><img src="https://hpa.unibo.it/public/site/images/msintini/hpa-cfp-8-pagina-1.jpg" alt="" width="285" height="201"></p> <p>Today’s general perception of Gulf cities is based on the assumption of a futuristic vision; a visionary development and a cluster of hi-tech constructions.</p> <p>Since the striking of oil, this ‘brave new world’ has been a testing ground for experimental, risk imbued architecture and real estate. The sudden affluence and ambition of the rulers to demonstrate progress and social advancements (sometimes expressed through outlandish ‘iconic’ designs) has certainly fired this drive. The building of cities seemed an appropriate culvert for the vast funds generated, turning what was once barren into a fertile land.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Furthermore, there is an ever-present sense of the ‘tabula-rasa approach’ that forced (or perhaps tempted) architects to pursue different and alternative design processes. Gulf cities seem to permit the idea, if not always the reality, of being able to ‘start again’, to be re-made, re-imagined and re-Modernised. There is a sense of being forever in the ‘now’, with ‘historical’ projects stretching back mere decades. Perhaps this desire to continually reinvent brought about shortcomings in early Modernist paradigms, and the rapid rise of new social/cultural/artistic concepts (such as pop art/metabolism/structuralism/post-modernism/idiosyncratic and so on).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>These preliminary reflections offer an image of the Gulf as a fluid ambit that challenged designers for several decades in the light of a central question: how do architects build in a place with a constantly changing context? How are ideas of history, tradition, memory, and heritage constructed in this flux?</p> <p>In the second half of the 20<sup>th</sup> century, the circumstantial conditions generated a series of experimental, utopian, sometimes unbuildable projects with a high level of idealisation. Some are renowned such proposals as Wright’s plan for Baghdad or the Smithsons’ Kuwait mat-building. Many are still to be unearthed as they were shelved and never implemented, or abandoned along the way, altered or demolished.</p> <p>In other cases, the region's specific constraints - such as limited material availability, narrow construction time and harsh climate, led architects to original ideas, technologies, and procurement methods with highly inventive and analytical processes.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Moreover, modern architecture in the Gulf seems somehow different for sporting an urge for negotiating the local context by ‘flirting’ with traditional elements of locality, such as geometrical motifs, shapes, textures or colour palette. The liberal application of decorative motifs, patterns, applied ornamentation needs careful examination, especially when it is so diligently applied to forms and arrangements more generally associated with a more austere modernist agenda.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The editors invite papers that extend the discussion on the Gulf built environment during the modernisation era, over the duality global/local as terms in opposition. Contributions are encouraged to analyse different architectural narratives, approaches and schools of thought to compensate the assumption that flattens ‘modernity’ as a one-directional, repetitive and monotone practice acquired and acritically transplanted into the Arab Peninsula.</p> <p>Focusing on the second half of the 20<sup>th</sup> century, and with an eye on the contemporary implications, possible topics include, but they are not limited to:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Experimental and inventive design practices</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Global aspiration and local constraints</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Context negotiation</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Materiality</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Knowledge exchanges and bijective practices</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Modernity, tradition and transition</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; De-colonial urbanism</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Identity formation and the built environment</p> <p>-&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Place-making, streetscapes and scale</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p class="Style1">Authors must submit directly full papers using <a>hpa.unibo.it</a>.</p> <p class="Style1">The guidelines for paper submission are available at <a href="/about/submissions#authorGuidelines">https://hpa.unibo.it/about/submissions#authorGuidelines</a></p> <p class="Style1">Please, fill in the author’s profile with all the information required as:</p> <p class="Style1">• Applicant’s name</p> <p class="Style1">• Professional affiliation</p> <p class="Style1">• Title of paper</p> <p class="Style1">• Abstract</p> <p class="Style1">• 5 keywords</p> <p class="Style1">• A brief CV (max 2,000 characters)</p> <p class="Style1">Please submit the proposal in the form of MS Word (length between 4,200 and 8,500 words). The submitted paper must be anonymous. Please delete from the text and file’s properties all information about name, administrator etc. Papers should clearly define the argument in relation to the available literature and indicate the sources which the paper is based on.</p> <p class="Style1">All papers received will go through a process of double-blind peer review before publication.</p> <p class="Style1">HPA also looks for contributions for the review section. <a href="/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies">https://hpa.unibo.it/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies</a></p> <p class="Style1">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Style1">To addressed questions to the editors:<br>roberto.fabbri@udem.edu<br>Iain.Jackson@liverpool.ac.uk</p> <p class="Style1">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Style1">- 31 December: Deadline for paper submission</p> <p class="Style1">- January: Notification of acceptance</p> <p class="Style1">- January-March: Peer-review process</p> <p class="Style1">- April-May: Copy editing and proofreading</p> <p class="Style1">- June 2021: Publication</p> 2020-07-30T00:00:00+02:00 https://hpa.unibo.it/announcement/view/393 Committed, Politicized, or Operative: Figures of Engagement in Criticism from 1945 to Today - Call for Papers - HPA 7/2020 2020-04-20T00:00:00+02:00 Histories of Postwar Architecture <p class="Style1"><img src="https://hpa.unibo.it/public/site/images/msintini/hpa-cfp-7-pagina-1.jpg" alt="" width="298" height="210"></p> <p class="Style1">Issue edited by Hélène Jannière (Université Rennes 2) and Paolo Scrivano (Politecnico di Milano)</p> <p class="Style1">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Style1">Call for paper deadline: July 31, 2020</p> <p class="Style1">&nbsp;<strong>NEW DEADLINE SEPTEMBER 15, 2020</strong></p> <p class="Style1">In a 1995 article on the renewal of architectural criticism, French architect and critic Bernard Huet referred to Charles Baudelaire to define art criticism as necessarily – in the poet’s words – “partial, impassionate, political”. During the 1990s, perhaps as a reaction to the 1980s, when in many specialized publications architectural criticism was identified as “communication” or even as promotion of architects and architectures, it emerged an extensive nostalgia for a notion of criticism associated to the historical avant-gardes. In this “committed” criticism or in the “politicized” one it was possible to emphasize the critic’s influential and active role in discovering, promoting, and intellectually supporting groups of artists or architects. The idea of a “golden age” of criticism has thus spread, being from time to time related to the end of the 19<sup>th</sup> century, to the 1920s, and to the 1960s and 1970s.</p> <p class="Style1">This issue of HPA intends to collect studies devoted to historical examples of “committed” and “politicized” criticism, reflecting on the real meanings of these concepts and on the themes and subjects to which they are tied. On the one hand, the figure of “committed” critic might be linked to the art and architecture avant-gardes from the end of the 19<sup>th</sup> century onward, hence defining a privileged relationship between critic and artist/architect; on the other, “politicized” criticism can be characterized as the understanding in political terms of architectural and city phenomena. Among the questions the issue wants to address are: in which way do these definitions of “committed” and “politicized” criticism come close to or differ from the definition of “operative” criticism, in the various meanings that have been attributed to it since Manfredo Tafuri? What are the theoretical tools, the rhetorical constructions, and the intellectual and political references of “committed” and “politicized” criticism? Should the latter be necessarily bound to the author’s belonging to a party or political group? What are their principal ways of circulation (specialized periodicals, journals, targeted actions)? In which measure did “politicized” criticism influence architecture’s historical narrative? And finally, what are the interlacements and the convergences between criticism’s intellectual and artistic engagement and the political commitment?</p> <p class="Style1">The issue of HPA intends to include contributions dealing with specific case studies or themes, with a periodization that spans from the end of the Second World War to the present date.</p> <p class="Style1">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Style1">Authors must submit directly full papers using <a>hpa.unibo.it</a>.</p> <p class="Style1">The guidelines for paper submission are available at <a href="/about/submissions#authorGuidelines">https://hpa.unibo.it/about/submissions#authorGuidelines</a></p> <p class="Style1">Please, fill in the author’s profile with all the information required as:</p> <p class="Style1">• Applicant’s name</p> <p class="Style1">• Professional affiliation</p> <p class="Style1">• Title of paper</p> <p class="Style1">• Abstract</p> <p class="Style1">• 5 keywords</p> <p class="Style1">• A brief CV (max 2,000 characters)</p> <p class="Style1">Please submit the proposal in the form of MS Word (length between 20,000 and 50,000 characters). The submitted paper must be anonymous. Please delete from the text and file’s properties all information about name, administrator etc. Papers should clearly define the argument in relation to the available literature and indicate the sources which the paper is based on.</p> <p class="Style1">All papers received will go through a process of double-blind peer review before publication.</p> <p class="Style1">HPA also looks for contributions for the review section. <a href="/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies">https://hpa.unibo.it/about/editorialPolicies#sectionPolicies</a></p> <p class="Style1">&nbsp;</p> <p class="Style1">- 31 July: Deadline for paper submission</p> <p class="Style1">- September: Notification of acceptance</p> <p class="Style1">- September-October: Peer-review process</p> <p class="Style1">- November-December: Copy editing and proofreading</p> <p class="Style1">- December 2020: Publication</p> 2020-04-20T00:00:00+02:00